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Tender Loving Care Senior Residence is a fully licensed assisted living / residential care home with Alzheimer’s Care endorsement that goes beyond many of care options like assisted living, memory care units, adult day care, home care, and respite care. Those choices tend to be less complete, shorter term, less personal and more expensive.

Answer by:

Admin

on Jun 24,2015

Answer by:

Shawn McGivney

on Aug 19,2015

The thing that is missing is continuity of care especially for those with all chronic illnesses. Many mistakely believe continuity of the chart is the same thing as continuity of care but care and human emotions require a relationship and the chart just does not do it. If you say the chart is better than no chart that is true. But do not think for one second that the chart is any where close to having a doctor who knows you, treats you, refers less, and is willing to say I am the responsible party. Continuity of care is what is needed and preferred. Does anyone agree?
The missing components in today's elder care options, whether in the hospital or in an elder care setting, are the lack of continuity of care and the personal relationship you have with your own personal doctor and their care team. Today, our choices for elder care are dictated by insurance companies and big institutions. These institutions direct the care and services they deem worthwhile and the doctors who participate in these insurances or institutions have to comply with the insurance company's standards in order to get paid and for the insurance to pay for the services the patient receives. Under these systems everything is changing readily including the medial professional, the staff, and caregivers. Thus, it becomes next to impossible to keep track of who is who or what the expectations and responsibilities are of any one person. Some people may have a doctor in the community that they know every well, but that doctor often cannot visit you in the hospital or in whatever care setting you may be in due to the institutions rules. These types of systems are counterproductive when compared to the old fashioned family doctor at a time when your doctor spent time with you and had a personal relationship with each patient. In past, doctor used to be the coordinator and was solely responsible for directing and managing ones care and responsible for the outcomes. These new closed systems of care like in hospitals and large institutional type settings often leads to more disjointed and incomplete care due to the fact that changing doctors and related staff will have great difficulty staying current on the varied issues related to the best outcome for an individual's care including emotional health, social issues and interaction or support from the family or social system. We have found that families and people with chronic diseases including Alzheimer's Dementia, COPD, gait, and mobility issues really need that consistency of knowing their doctor and the care team he directs and working together to get the best possible care during a very stressful time.

Answer by:

Admin

on Oct 13,2015

Answer by:

Admin

on Oct 19,2015

The missing components in today\'s elder care options, whether in the hospital or in an elder care setting, are the lack of continuity of care and the personal relationship you have with your own personal doctor and their care team. Today, our choices for elder care are dictated by insurance companies and big institutions. These institutions direct the care and services they deem worthwhile and the doctors who participate in these insurances or institutions have to comply with the insurance company\'s standards in order to get paid and for the insurance to pay for the services the patient receives. Under these systems everything is changing readily including the medial professional, the staff, and caregivers. Thus, it becomes next to impossible to keep track of who is who or what the expectations and responsibilities are of any one person. Some people may have a doctor in the community that they know every well, but that doctor often cannot visit you in the hospital or in whatever care setting you may be in due to the institutions rules. These types of systems are counterproductive when compared to the old fashioned family doctor at a time when your doctor spent time with you and had a personal relationship with each patient. In past, doctor used to be the coordinator and was solely responsible for directing and managing ones care and responsible for the outcomes. These new closed systems of care like in hospitals and large institutional type settings often leads to more disjointed and incomplete care due to the fact that changing doctors and related staff will have great difficulty staying current on the varied issues related to the best outcome for an individual\'s care including emotional health, social issues and interaction or support from the family or social system. We have found that families and people with chronic diseases including Alzheimer\'s Dementia, COPD, gait, and mobility issues really need that consistency of knowing their doctor and the care team he directs and working together to get the best possible care during a very stressful time.
The missing components in today's elder care options, whether in the hospital or in an elder care setting, are the lack of continuity of care and the personal relationship you have with your own personal doctor and their care team. Today, our choices for elder care are dictated by insurance companies and big institutions. These institutions direct the care and services they deem worthwhile and the doctors who participate in these insurances or institutions have to comply with the insurance company's standards in order to get paid and for the insurance to pay for the services the patient receives. Under these systems everything is changing readily including the medial professional, the staff, and caregivers. Thus, it becomes next to impossible to keep track of who is who or what the expectations and responsibilities are of any one person. Some people may have a doctor in the community that they know every well, but that doctor often cannot visit you in the hospital or in whatever care setting you may be in due to the institutions rules. These types of systems are counterproductive when compared to the old fashioned family doctor at a time when your doctor spent time with you and had a personal relationship with each patient. In past, doctor used to be the coordinator and was solely responsible for directing and managing ones care and responsible for the outcomes. These new closed systems of care like in hospitals and large institutional type settings often leads to more disjointed and incomplete care due to the fact that changing doctors and related staff will have great difficulty staying current on the varied issues related to the best outcome for an individual's care including emotional health, social issues and interaction or support from the family or social system. We have found that families and people with chronic diseases including Alzheimer's Dementia, COPD, gait, and mobility issues really need that consistency of knowing their doctor and the care team he directs and working together to get the best possible care during a very stressful time.

Answer by:

Admin

on Oct 20,2015

Answer by:

Admin

on Oct 20,2015

The missing components in Long term Care (LTC) elder care options in today's time, be it in hospital or in an elder care setting, are the lack of personal relationship one has with personal doctor and care team, and the continuity of care. Today, the choices for elder care are directed by our over reliance on insurance companies and big institutions and these institutions direct the care and services they consider worthwhile. Also, the participating doctors have to comply with the insurance company's standards so as to get paid for their service and for the insurance to pay for the services the patient receives. Things are rapidly changing including the medial professional, staff, as well as caregivers. This makes it extremely difficult to track who’s who along with the expectations and responsibilities of the people involved. Often people have good relation with a doctor in their locality, but he or she might not be eligible to visit the patient in the hospital or in whatever care setting because of the rules and guidelines of the institution. This is quite a counterproductive system in comparison to old fashioned family doctor system, wherein doctor used to spend time with you and in fact had a personal relationship with nearly every patient. Therefore, doctor used to be the sole coordinator and was responsible for managing patients care and responsibility of the outcomes. These LTC systems are a new type of closed system of care just like in hospitals and large institutional type settings that often leads to incoherent and incomplete care because of frequently changing doctors and staff. This makes it difficult to stay current on various issues to achieve the best outcome for an individual's care including emotional health, social issues and interaction or support from the family or social system. It has been observed that families and people with chronic diseases including Alzheimer's Dementia, mobility, and COPD must have a consistent doctor and the care team as they can work together to deliver the best possible care to the patient during the stressful time.
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